Upcoming February Events!

Thank you for your continued support and participation with Cooperation Humboldt. Together, we are proving that we can build a local economy that puts people and planet before profit.Today we are thinking about the powerful words of African-American author, film-maker, and college professor Toni Cade Bambara who famously said, “The role of the artist is to make the revolution irresistible.”

It is in that spirt that we invite you to attend the 3rd annual Artists Dismantling Capitalism Symposium happening on Saturday, February 29 from 9:00am – 5:30pm at the Arcata Playhouse, located at 1251 9th St in Arcata (The Creamery Building).

This event is highly participatory and brings together artists, culture workers, and anyone who knows that we can collectively create a society that is loving, compassionate, inclusive and beautiful.


The day will begin with an Opening Session that includes an interactive performance that imagines shifting from an extractive economy to a regenerative one. Throughout the day 16 participatory workshops will be facilitated by artists, community members and others.

Vegan lunch is included.

Childcare will be provided on request with at least 5 days notice prior to event. Please note in your registration form if you will be needing childcare.

To register, please click here.

Donations to help us cover the costs of the conference are appreciated, but not required.



We also want to invite you another upcoming workshop:

The Whiteness Within: Challenging White Supremacy Culture, which will be offered on Saturday, February 15 from 1:00pm – 3:00pm at The Labor Temple, located at 840 E Street in Eureka.This theatre-based workshop is inspired by “White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism” by Robin DiAngelo and will give participants a chance to recognize how white supremacy culture shows up in their own lives, and provide an opportunity to practice confronting and challenging those behaviors.

Please be sure to follow us on Facebook and Instagram to stay up to date on how Cooperation Humboldt empowers our community to build a brighter future!

With hope for a collaborative future for all,

The Cooperation Humboldt Team
Cooperation Humboldt
707.273.1146

EcoNews Feb/March 2020 – ‘Exploring Ecovillages with Cooperation Humboldt’

This article by Tamara McFarland was featured in the February/March 2020 issue of EcoNews.

Image result for ecovillageThe average size of a new house in the United States has doubled since 1960, while the average number of household members has dropped from 3.3 in 1960 to 2.6 today. As our physical footprint per-capita has risen, so too have our nation’s carbon emissions and our rates of social isolation.

One in five US residents report feeling lonely or socially isolated, and this lack of connection can have serious effects on physical health, with researchers reporting that loneliness can be as damaging to health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. The US Department of Health & Human Services reports that “As a force in shaping our health, medical care pales in comparison with the circumstances of the communities in which we live. Few aspects of community are more powerful than is the degree of connectedness and social support for individuals.”

At Cooperation Humboldt, we understand the critical importance of human connection and interdependence, both for individual quality of life, and as an important way to transition to a sustainable and regenerative way of living with one another and in harmony with the planet. One of the ways we’re currently working to build the world we need is by incubating one or more Ecovillages in Humboldt County.

An Ecovillage is a community with the goal of becoming more socially, culturally, economically, and ecologically sustainable. e idea is to create living arrangements that have a positive, regenerative impact on the natural environment through ethical sourcing of building materials, physical construction  and design, and behavior choices.

The Ecovillages we envision will foster mutual support and meet residents’ inherent needs for autonomy and connection with the natural world. They will also provide important economic benefits to residents by empowering them to build equity if desired, and to participate in a democratic process to help make decisions on the issues that affect their lives and housing.

With support from Cooperation Humboldt, we expect that each Ecovillage will be designed by a group of potential residents who would likely coalesce around some kind of theme or shared interest – permaculture, arts/culture, folks with young kids, etc. Over time, we envision creating a local network of ecovillages, each with its own theme and culture.

Each Ecovillage will include features like renewable energy, water catchment, grey water, and edible landscapes – but beyond that, each village is likely to end up looking quite different. Some could be more urban, while others may be more rural; some villages will be made up of completely separate fully featured homes, while others will include tiny homes with larger central shared facilities (or any number of other
combinations of physical features).

Because the specifics around our first project will depend so much on who is going to live there, and what their skills and passions are, we are now in a process to convene one or more groups of folks who would actually want to live at the first Ecovillage. Cooperation Humboldt will offer resources, support, and capitalization, and we require direct participation now from future residents so that we can build this first ecovillage to fit their needs and aspirations.

If you’d like to learn more or join us in this process, please visit cooperationhumboldt.org/ecovillage.

Tell the City of Eureka – We Need Clean Solutions!

According to an article in the Tululwat Examiner, Eureka city staff plans to apply for grant funding to purchase a generator for use at a warming center that can accommodate up to 2,400 people during future blackouts.

While we wholeheartedly support the desire to create centers to care for our community members during future outages, we know that investing in more generators – which are huge consumers of fossil fuels, as well as terribly noisy/smelly/polluting, and a fire risk – is not the solution.* City of Eureka, please consider alternatives before you proceed. We at Cooperation Humboldt would love to work with you on grant applications for solar panel systems for more city buildings and community spaces that can provide power/warmth in a much more responsible way, and lead us as a community in the direction we need to go, not backwards.

We advocate for pursuing a Resilient Hubs model, and hope to engage with local governments and community groups to make plans in alignment with values of resilience, regeneration, and community wellness.

Image result for resilient hubs

Dirty power is what got us into this mess in the first place – investing in more isn’t going to get us out.

Call to Action

Eureka residents, please call your city representatives and demand that the city’s planning for disaster preparedness be done responsibly (bonus points if you offer to serve on a committee to support this goal!) –

  • Greg Sparks, City Manager – (707) 441-4144
  • Susan Seaman, Mayor – (707) 441-4200
  • Leslie Castellano, Councilmember, Ward 1 – (707) 441-4169
  • Heidi Messner, Councilmember, Ward 2 – (707) 441-4168
  • Natalie Arroyo, Councilmember, Ward 3 – (707) 441-4171
  • Austin Allison, Councilmember, Ward 4 – (707) 441-4167
  • Kim Bergel, Councilmember, Ward 5 – (707) 441-4170

* We understand that for those of us with extreme needs (medical, etc.), generators may be the only affordable solution at the moment at a personal/household level during crisis. We aren’t seeking to shame anyone who uses one for legitimate need. But we believe the City has an opportunity here to lead by example and show a better way forward.